A philip randolph 48th conference

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Who was Philip Randolph?

Philip Randolph was born April 15, 1889, in Crescent City, Florida, the second son of the James William Randolph, a tailor and minister in an African Methodist Episcopal Church, and Elizabeth Robinson Randolph, a skilled seamstress.

What did Asa Philip Randolph do?

Asa Philip Randolph (April 15, 1889 – May 16, 1979) was a leader in the Civil Rights Movement, the American labor movement, and socialist political parties.

What happened to a Philip Randolph and the BCSP?

In 1965, Rustin took charge of the newly founded A. Philip Randolph Institute, which replaced the NALC as the primary mode of advancing Randolph’s labor and civil rights goals. Randolph retired as president of the BCSP in 1968, and his public profile gradually receded as his health worsened.

What is the significance of Randolph’s theory of collective action?

At this point, Randolph developed what would become his distinctive form of civil rights activism, which emphasized the importance of collective action as a way for black people to gain legal and economic equality.

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Overview

Asa Philip Randolph (April 15, 1889 – May 16, 1979) was an American labor unionist and civil rights activist. In 1925, he organized and led the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first successful African-American led labor union. In the early Civil Rights Movement and the Labor Movement, Randolph was a prominent voice. His continuous agitation with the support of fellow labor righ…


Biography

Philip Randolph was born April 15, 1889, in Crescent City, Florida, the second son of the James William Randolph, a tailor and minister in an African Methodist Episcopal Church, and Elizabeth Robinson Randolph, a skilled seamstress. In 1891, the family moved to Jacksonville, Florida, which had a thriving, well-established African-American community.


Awards and accolades

• In 1942, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People awarded Randolph the Spingarn Medal.
• In 1953, the IBPOEW (Black Elks) awarded him their Elijah P. Lovejoy Medal, given “to that American who shall have worked most successfully to advance the cause of human rights, and for the freedom of Negro people.”


Legacy

Randolph had a significant impact on the Civil Rights Movement from the 1930s onward. The Montgomery bus boycott in Alabama was directed by E.D. Nixon, who had been a member of the BSCP and was influenced by Randolph’s methods of nonviolent confrontation. Nationwide, the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s and 1960s used tactics pioneered by Randolph, such as encouraging African A…


See also

• List of civil rights leaders
• Milton P. Webster


Footnotes

1. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica
2. ^ A Budget for All Americans pdf
3. ^ “Spartacus Educational”. Spartacus School. Archived from the original on August 5, 2011. Retrieved August 28, 2011.
4. ^ Pfeffer, Paula F. (2000). “Randolph; Asa Philip”. American National Biography Online. Oxford University Press. Retrieved February 27, 2013.


Further reading

• Jervis Anderson, A. Philip Randolph: A Biographical Portrait. New York: Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, 1973.
• Thomas R. Brooks and A.H. Raskin, “A. Philip Randolph, 1889–1979”, The New Leader, June 4, 1979, pp. 6–9.
• Daniel S. Davis, Mr. Black Labor: The Story of A. Philip Randolph, Father of the Civil Rights Movement. New York: Dutton, 1972.


External links

• “Oral History Interview with A. Philip Randolph, from the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library”. Archived from the original on November 16, 2001. Retrieved December 9, 2017.
• A. Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum
• A. Philp Randolph Institute The Senior Constituency Group of the

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