A study of vehicle operation policy in warehouse conference

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Is there a lean approach to warehouse operations?

warehouse operations. More recently, Shah and Khanzode ( in -press) reviewed warehouse storage-handling systems from lean perspective and presented a framework for it. performance m easures a ffecting each function o f warehousing and its overall productivity.

Does research on warehouse operations have a significant economic impact?

Clearly, the research domain of warehouse operations is very rich and challenging. Given the prevalence of warehouses in the supply chains, such research results can have a significant economic impact. N. Ascheuer, M. Grotschel, A.A.-

What is the vehicle operation mode control?

The vehicle operation mode control is a layer above the system functional control, which can override the strategies within the functional control layer, according to the vehicle operation mode.

How does point of view affect production warehouse design?

point of view as it a l so affects production warehouse design, planning and co ntrol operations. are considered as part of design rather than operational issues. 4. Conclusions and Future directions highlights import an t conclusions derived under various constraints and circumstances. The together the related research papers.

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What are the components of warehouse services?

Individual components of warehouse services are described: logistics, marketing, information, credit and financial, and production. The content of the activities of service organizations, operators of warehouse services, is released. The study highlights the growth of the market, changes in the structure of demand, insufficient development of warehouse outsourcing and complex warehouse services as the main trends in the warehouse services market. The evaluation of the current condition of the warehouse property market that determines the quantity and quality of storage services, the focus is on the development of new warehouses formats (wholesale distribution centers, self-storage warehouses and warehouses of “last mile”), a significant part of “custom” warehouses marked as a trend.


What is intralogistics in manufacturing?

Intralogistics is increasingly a matter of research and development as a form of optimization, automation, integration and management of the flow of materials and information that circulate within a business unit. With a strong connection to material handling equipment and automation solutions, intralogistics has proved to be one of the main factors responsible for something that is already happening: a fourth industrial revolution where it is possible to convert warehouses and manufacturing units into smart environments where the entire process can be controlled and supervised through a single system. It became necessary to develop more innovative and efficient solutions to the constant diversity of challenges proposed by the market. In this sense, it was proposed to develop something innovative within the area of Automated Storage and Retrieval Systems (AS/RS), a technology increasingly sought after by today’s manufacturing plants. As such, the goal was to improve the most emergent AS/RS in recent years: the Pallet/Box Shuttle AS/RS. In order to achieve the proposed objective, it was necessary to analyze all the existing solutions in the market and, mainly, to find the main systems to be improved and the direction to follow in order to create a novel solution based on the existing advanced solutions. Moreover, regarding the recent needs required by the smart factories and Industry 4.0, it was intended that the new system would be able to make an optimized selection of products, forming sets or sub-sets of different products picking them from different places of the rack, a situation that is quite frequent in companies that produce and assemble equipment. The solution obtained shows that it is possible to increase the automation of the operations in the storage systems and improve the responsiveness of the system, taking this solution to a new level. Different products can be picked-up and put in a same box, providing a set of products/components able to be used in a production line or to be provided to a customer.


What is the most important warehouse indicator?

… Thus, this study found that the most important warehouse productivity indicator is Warehouse Management System (WMS) into the warehouse information system resource. This can be seemed that the main advantages of WMS assist in the reduction of warehouse storage space, greater accuracy in stock information, increase operational speed and quality, as well as boosting the productivity of labour and warehouse equipment (Caridade et al., 2017; Pane et al., 2018). On the other hand, throughput is referred to goods leaving the warehouse. …


What is the need for research focusing on the operational management of warehousing systems?

In summary, there continues to be a need for research focusing on the operational management of warehousing systems, where the different processes in the warehouse are considered jointly, the problems are placed in their dynamic nature, and multiple objectives are considered simultaneously.


What is the most studied problem in warehouse operation?

In summary, the sequencing and routing problem is the most studied problem in warehouse operation. Most of the research assumes that the locations to be visited are given. The problem when multiple candidate locations are available for the retrieval or storage of an SKU remains an interesting and challenging research problem (for example, see Daniels et al., 1998 ). Also, in a warehouse setting, batching is closely related to sequencing, and therefore those problems require a joint solution method. Furthermore, because of the confined and narrow travel paths in a warehouse, another relevant variant of the sequencing and routing problem would consider congestion when there are multiple order picking tours executed at the same time period in the same area.


What are the requirements for a warehouse?

The basic requirements in warehouse operations are to receive Stock Keeping Units (SKUs) from suppliers, store the SKUs, receive orders from customers, retrieve SKUs and assemble them for shipment, and ship the completed orders to customers. There are many issues involved in designing and operating a warehouse to meet these requirements. Resources, such as space, labor, and equipment, need to be allocated among the different warehouse functions, and each function needs to be carefully implemented, operated, and coordinated in order to achieve system requirements in terms of capacity, throughput, and service at the minimum resource cost.


What is a SLAP warehouse?

The storage location assignment problem (SLAP) is to assign incoming products to storage locations in storage departments/zones in order to reduce material handling cost and improve space utilization. Different warehouse departments might use different SLAP policies depending on the department-specific SKU profiles and storage technology. The storage location assignment problem is formally defined as follows: Given:#N#(1)#N#Information on the storage area, including its physical configuration and storage layout.#N#(2)#N#Information on the storage locations, including their availability, physical dimensions, and location.#N#(3)#N#Information on the set of items to be stored, including their physical dimensions, demand, quantity, arrival and departure times.#N#Determine:#N#The physical location where arriving items will be stored.#N#Subject to performance criteria and constraints such as:#N#(1)#N#Storage capacity and efficiency.#N#(2)#N#Picker capacity and efficiency based on the picker cycle time.#N#(3)#N#Response time.#N#(4)#N#Compatibility between products and storage locations and the compatibility between products.#N#(5)#N#Item retrieval policy such as FIFO (first-in, first-out), LIFO (last-in, first-out), BFIFO (batch first-in, first-out). When using the BFIFO policy, items that arrived in the same replenishment batch are considered to be equivalent.


What is warehouse in supply chain?

Warehouses are an essential component of any supply chain. Their major roles include: buffering the material flow along the supply chain to accommodate variability caused by factors such as product seasonality and/or batching in production and transportation; consolidation of products from various suppliers for combined delivery to customers; and value-added-processing such as kitting, pricing, labeling, and product customization.


Is there any direct evidence of collaboration between academic research and industry?

Furthermore, there is little direct evidence of collaboration of the academic research community with industry. Many of the research results are not sufficiently communicated to industry to make a significant impact on the practice of warehouse operations.


Can a SKU be stored in more than one warehouse?

A SKU may be stored in more than one warehouse department. The specification of departments is a design decision. Once the departments are specified, one needs to determine which SKU should be stored in which department, in what quantity, and what are the corresponding inter-departmental moves for that SKU. In some cases, this decision is straightforward. For example, if a department is dedicated to a certain customer, then all SKUs for that customer are assigned to that department; or if a SKU will be stored and picked only in units of pallets, then it will be assigned only to the pallet storage department. In other cases, a SKU could be assigned to multiple departments. These departments are usually different in terms of their storage and material-handling capability. Therefore, a careful decision needs to be made in order to balance the tradeoff between storage and material handling cost and capacities.


What is warehouse operations?

Warehouse operations include receiving and unloading inbound materials, putting them away into appropriate storage locations, picking the required materials based on customer orders, and dispatching them to the customer. Any compromise in the performance of any one of these aspects can affect the overall productivity of the warehouse and eventually impact the supply chain as a whole. In fact, material handling along with inventory management is one of the most critical components in supply chain and logistics management.


What is the S shape policy?

In the S-shape policy, the path followed by the order pickers is in the shape of an S. This implies that any aisle containing at least one pick is traveled entirely by the order picker as illustrated in Fig. 7 a. Aisles without picks are not entered and the order picker returns to the drop-off location (depot) from the last visited aisle.


What is the objective of vehicle routing?

The objective of the vehicle routing model is to minimize the travel distance/time. It is important to note that the optimal shortest route may not be the most frequently used one by order pickers in practice. This is mainly because the optimal route may not be readily available to order pickers when they start a tour, which consists of the set of pick locations and associated routes, for order picking. Moreover, the optimal shortest route for each tour will be different, which may be not very convenient for order pickers because it is in general easier to follow certain consistent rules instead of following different routes for each tour. Finally, the vehicle routing problem needs to be solved for each order picking tour, which could be time consuming that may require a high level of computing power. For those reasons, other routing policies such as S-shape, return, mid-point, and largest gap, which will be briefly introduced in this section, have been employed.


What is the largest gap policy?

When there is a pick up location in an aisle, there can be three gaps: (1) the distance between the top cross aisle and the first pick location in the aisle, (2) the distance between two middle pick locations, and (3) the distance between the bottom cross aisle and the last pick location. The largest of these three gaps is avoided as shown in Fig. 7 d.


How to evaluate routing policies?

To evaluate the routing policies by simulation, the inherent random pick locations and random pick amount need to be considered for which two scenarios are generated. In scenario 1, it is assumed that the pick locations are uniformly distributed throughout the racks section of the warehouse as shown in Fig. 9 a, which may correspond to the random storage policy. In scenario 2, the warehouse is divided into two sections as shown in Fig. 9 b, which may correspond to the zone storage policy. The first section (left section) is near to the inbound area and has less frequency items whereas the second section (right section) is close to the outbound area and holds high frequency items. As the high frequency items are placed near the outbound area, 75% of pick locations are generated from the right section while 25% of them are from the left section. As such, the number of picks generated on the right section near the outbound area are three times more than that of the left section near the inbound area. Note that within each section, the pick locations are uniformly distributed.


What is warehouse in logistics?

A warehouse is a component of a logistical system. It appears as a link in both the supply chain and supply network. Goods are temporarily stored in a warehouse and then directed to other links. As far as a warehouse is concerned, the flows of goods are considered as the objects of both delivery and reception; those may be concentrated or separated. The roles of a warehouse have an impact on its organization of work, used technology as well as location. The article aims to present a method of improving the functioning of a warehouse concerning a chosen enterprise in the printing sector. A variety of recurring errors was found in the functioning of the warehouse of the analyzed enterprise. Those were disrupting the enterprise’s activity (mostly in terms of logistics). The irregularities were connected with the structure of the information system as well as with the organization of work. The method of improvement of the warehousing process used by the chosen enterprise was presented. The changes in terms of the information system were observed to have a positive impact on solving the problems reported by the employees.


What are the roles of a warehouse?

The roles of a warehouse have an impact on its organization of work, used technology as well as location. The article aims to present a method of improving the functioning of a warehouse concerning a chosen enterprise in the printing sector.


What is warehouse in logistics?

A warehouse is a component of a logistical system. It appears as a link in both the supply chain and supply network. Goods are temporarily stored in a warehouse and then directed to other links. As far as a warehouse is concerned, the flows of goods are considered as the objects of both delivery and reception; those may be concentrated or separated. The roles of a warehouse have an impact on its organization of work, used technology as well as location. The article aims to present a method of improving the functioning of a warehouse concerning a chosen enterprise in the printing sector. A variety of recurring errors was found in the functioning of the warehouse of the analyzed enterprise. Those were disrupting the enterprise’s activity (mostly in terms of logistics). The irregularities were connected with the structure of the information system as well as with the organization of work. The method of improvement of the warehousing process used by the chosen enterprise was presented. The changes in terms of the information system were observed to have a positive impact on solving the problems reported by the employees.


What is the purpose of the article?

Purpose: The purpose of the article is the selection of the best criteria for the normalisation method in order to achieve the minimal order picking route and time. Design/Methodology/Approach: When a company utilizes warehouse with the shared storage system, every product can be stored in many, sometimes very distant from each other, locations. Locations were selected by the multiple-criteria decision-making technique-TOPSIS. The research was conducted by means of the simulation methods. Every location was described by three criteria (distance from the I/O point, degree of demand satisfaction and the number of other picked products in the proximity of the analyzed location), for which 37 combinations of weights and 18 normalization formulas were applied. For every combination of weights and normalization method 1000 orders were generated. Findings: The best results were obtained when high weight was assigned to the degree of demand satisfaction. It was hard to indicate unequivocally the best normalization method. However, quotient inversions generally yielded slightly worse results than standard scores and feature scaling. Practical Implications: Obtained results indicate that the presented approach can be useful in real warehouse management. It is a quite versatile method that can be adopted to various situations. Originality/value: Although the routing problem in order picking has already been widely discussed, the literature about the problem of selection of locations in shared storage is quite scarce. Therefore, the presented approach can serve as one method of selection of locations in the shared storage system.


What is the most important issue in ROV operations?

By far, the most important working issue in ROV operations is tether management. In operations at or near the bottom, the objective is to reduce the amount of tether the submersible is required to pull to the work site through judicious use of the deployment cage, tether management system, or clump weight. With the weight or managing platform (i.e., the cage or TMS) forming the center point of a circle of operation, the deployment platform (e.g., the boat, dynamically positioned vessel, or drilling rig) can be moved to within the operational radius of the work site, allowing the work to be easily performed with minimal excess tether ( Figure 21.15 ).


What is parts consumption?

The parts consumption model includes the cost of the parts consumption and labor. The damage to the vehicle depends on the stresses that are caused by roughness and roadway geometrics. The roughness causes fatigue damages on the suspension system and driving system. The roadway geometrics cause wearing damage on the vehicle and brake systems when the operating state of a vehicle is changed (ie, turning and climbing). A single effect and/or combined effect of the two stresses caused damages to the vehicle. The parts consumption is one key part of the vehicle operation cost. Table 8.5 lists the surveyed data from a transportation company from 1984 to 1988. It can be seen that the parts consumption is about half of the fuel consumption and two times the tire wear cost.

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