De’via conference 2019

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What is the major criteria for de Via?

De’VIA Criteria uses specific artistic strategies such as color contrast and centralized focus. generally within the field of visual fine arts and alternative media. not exclusive to Deaf artists and not inclusive of all Deaf artists.


Does a de via artist have to be Deaf?

Deaf Art is a term encompassing all artists who are Deaf, while De’VIA art can be made by Deaf and hearing individuals, as long as it represents the Deaf experience and perspective.


Who are de Via artists?

Nine visual artists came together: painter Chuck Baird, art historian Deborah (Sonnenstrahl) Blumenson, fiber artist Nancy Creighton, video artist Lai-Yok Ho, Fiber artist Sandi Inches-Vasnick, sculptor Paul Johnson, painter Betty Miller, painter Alex Wilhite and sculptor Guy Wonder.


Who was the main leader of the De via movement?

De’Via stands for “Deaf View/Image Art“. It all started with a group of Deaf Artists in May of 1989 when they attended a workshop at Gallaudet University. Betty Miller and Paul Johnston led this workshop. Together, at the Deaf Way, they created the De’via Manifesto.


Who can create de Via?

De’VIA is created when the artist intends to express their Deaf experience through visual art. De’VIA may also be created by deafened or hearing artists, if the intention is to create work that is born of their Deaf experience (a possible example would be a hearing child of Deaf parents).


Why is total communication not used anymore?

The risks of using total communication in the classroom are that instructors may use them inconsistently. Plus, total communication may not meet the communication needs of all the deaf students in the classroom. This can have an impact on how well the educational information is received by the deaf student.


Who is Nancy Creighton?

Nancy Creighton is a deaf publications professional whose work ranges from writing through book design. She and Betty G. Miller have been partners sharing their lives together for the past 22 years.


Who were five of the first De via artists?

Some famous De’VIA artists are Betty G. Miller, Chuck Baird, Ann Silver, and Mary J. Thornley.


Who is Ann Silver?

Silver, who was born deaf, is a founding member of the historic Deaf Art Movement of the 1960s and 1970s that preceded the De’VIA movement, which represents deaf artists and perceptions based on their deaf experiences.


Who were the first de Via artists?

The first 20 years of De’VIA (1989-2009 was carried by a few strong De’VIA artists (Betty G. Miller, Chuck Baird, Guy Wonder, Susan Dupor, Harry Williams, Tony MacGregor, Ann Silver etc) with other artists coming and going.


What are the common symbols used in de Via *?

As part of the De’VIA curriculum, we have a growing list of MOTIFS, which are symbols commonly found in works about the Deaf experience.arrow– resistance- attacking, harming, trying to kill or stop or destroy.band aid –burning pianos– The Night it Rained Flaming Pianos by David Call. … clock-clouds-More items…


What do Deaf artists use in de Via?

De’VIA can be identified by formal elements such as Deaf artists’ possible tendency to use contrasting colors and values, intense colors, contrasting textures. It may also most often include a centralized focus, with exaggeration or emphasis on facial features, especially eyes, mouths, ears, and hands.


What is the De’Via genre?

Since its official designation as a genre, De’VIA has helped to introduce the Deaf experience to the artistic world and give a new platform to the Deaf community.


What are the two main categories of De’Via?

Thematically, De’VIA consists of two basic categories; Resistance De’VIA and Affirmation De’VIA.


What is deaf view art?

Deaf View/Image Art, abbreviated as De’VIA, is a genre of visual art that intentionally represents the Deaf experience and Deaf culture. Although De’VIA works have been created throughout history, the term was first defined and recognized as an art genre in 1989. In 1989, a group of nine Deaf artists gathered at Gallaudet University shortly …


What is the resistance de’via?

Ameslan is an old acronym for American Sign Language, which references the first few letters of each word: Ame (rican) S (ign) Lan (guage). The title references the act of not allowing Deaf people to sign.


How does De’Via highlight the eyes?

Some notable De’VIA pieces highlight the eyes by either scratching them out or switching them with other parts of the face. This can either showcase the artist’s feelings of being ignored by hearing people or emphasize the importance of the eyes in ASL.


Who created the Deaf Art manifesto?

Betty G. Miller and Paul Johnston held a workshop titled “Expression: American Deaf Art,” which took place at Gallaudet University in May 1989. Attendees spent four days discussing the experiences and elements of Deaf art. At the culmination of this workshop and their discussions, they created a written manifesto to coin the term De’VIA and detail its characteristics. The following list contains the artists that participated in this workshop and signed the manifesto:


Is Deaf Art inclusive?

not exclusive to Deaf artists and not inclusive of all Deaf artists. A major point of De’VIA is its differentiation from Deaf Art. Deaf Art is a term encompassing all artists who are Deaf, while De’VIA art can be made by Deaf and hearing individuals, as long as it represents the Deaf experience and perspective.

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Overview

Deaf View/Image Art, abbreviated as De’VIA, is a genre of visual art that intentionally represents the Deaf experience and Deaf culture. Although De’VIA works have been created throughout history, the term was first defined and recognized as an art genre in 1989. In 1989, a group of nine Deaf artists gathered at Gallaudet University shortly before the Deaf Way arts festival was being held there. Led by Betty G. Miller, known as the Mother of De’VIA, and Paul Johnston, these artist…


De’VIA Criteria

The De’VIA Manifesto, an original copy of which can be found in the De’VIA Curriculum, outlines the major criteria of De’VIA works. According to the manifesto and its signatories, De’VIA work is:
• representative of Deaf experiences
• uses specific artistic strategies such as color contrast and centralized focus


De’VIA Manifesto Signatories

Betty G. Miller and Paul Johnston held a workshop titled “Expression: American Deaf Art,” which took place at Gallaudet University in May 1989. Attendees spent four days discussing the experiences and elements of Deaf art. At the culmination of this workshop and their discussions, they created a written manifesto to coin the term De’VIA and detail its characteristics. The following list contains the artists that participated in this workshop and signed the manifesto:


De’VIA Categories

Thematically, De’VIA consists of two basic categories; Resistance De’VIA and Affirmation De’VIA.
This branch of De’VIA includes artworks that showcase themes of audism, oralism, mainstreaming, cochlear implants, identity confusion, and eugenics. All of these themes, typically negative in the eyes of the artist, are brought forward as a form of protest, as resistance De’VIA conveys how Deaf people have been oppressed, colonized and marginalized.


De’VIA Motifs

As in many art movements, there are common symbols (or motifs) repeatedly used among different De’VIA artists in their works. Some common motifs in De’VIA works include:
• Eyes
• Hands
• Ears


Notable De’VIA works

This illustration by Betty G. Miller, which can be viewed here, is an example of resistance De’VIA. Ameslan is an old acronym for American Sign Language, which references the first few letters of each word: Ame(rican) S(ign) Lan(guage). The title references the act of not allowing Deaf people to sign. Through the shackling of hands, it conveys the message that denying Deaf people access to signed languages is harmful, represented by the broken fingers. By portraying that Deaf peopl…


See also

• Arnaud Balard, founder of Surdism, a similar movement celebrating Deaf art


Further reading

• Miller, Betty G. (1994). “De’VIA (Deaf View/Image Art)”. In Erting, Carol J.; Johnson, Robert C.; et al. (eds.). The Deaf Way: Perspectives from the International Conference on Deaf Culture. Washington, D.C.: Gallaudet University Press. pp. 770–772. ISBN 9781563680267.

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