Did conferates collect union revenue stamps

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Mail that was postmarked after the date of a state’s admission into the Confederacy through May 31, 1861, and bearing U.S. (Union) postage is deemed to represent ‘Confederate State Usage of U.S. Stamps’. i.e., Confederate covers franked with Union stamps.

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Answer

How many Union and Confederate Civil War postage stamps are there?

Union and Confederate Civil War covers from prisoners of war in 83 Union and 58 Confederate Prisons, compiled from a total over 2,700 covers. Boston Athenæum: Postage Stamps from the Confederate States of America, Digital Collection.

Who made the postage stamp for the Confederacy?

Postage stamps. It was printed by the lithograph process by Hoyer and Ludwig of Richmond, Virginia. Like almost all Confederate issues, these stamps were imperforate, and single stamps had to be cut from the sheet with razors or scissors. This stamp was reprinted in blue in 1862.

What was the first revenue stamp in the US?

US Revenue Stamps. In 18th-century America, some of the first revenue stamps were produced to collect taxes on liquor. These stamps, known as Supervisors’ Seals, featured embossed rather than printed designs on their faces, as did the stamps used to collect taxes on paper and parchment, which were issued in 1798.

How did the Union have a numerical advantage over the Confederacy?

For a start, the Confederate states had a population of only 9 million compared to the 23 million people in the Union states. This made it harder for the Confederacy to field large enough armies and fight the Union. In fact, the numerical advantage of the Union armies proved the decisive factor in the war.

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Why was the printing of postal stamps delayed for the Confederate postal system?

Why was the printing of postal stamps delayed for the Confederate postal system? The stamp designs had to be imported from England.


How did the Confederacy get funds for the war?

Early in the war the Confederacy relied mostly on tariffs on imports and on taxes on exports to raise revenues.


Did the Confederacy print their own money?

Beginning in March 1861, the Confederate States of America began printing its own paper banknotes. The earliest notes, known as the Montgomery Issue, after the Confederacy’s first capital in Montgomery, Alabama, were printed in New York by the National Bank Note Company and smuggled across the Union lines.


Did the Confederacy have income tax?

The Confederacy also collected income taxes. It authorized its first national income tax measure in 1863. The Confederate bill that finally passed after great debate was a graduated income tax. It exempted wages up to $1,000, levied a 1% tax on the first $1,500 over the exemption, and 2% on all additional income.


Who financed the Union Civil War?

On July 17, 1861, Congress enabled the Treasury to borrow as much as $250 million for the war effort by issuing bonds and notes. The idea was to sell these to a wide range of investors, including small-business owners and families. By buying their government’s “paper”, Americans showed their support for the war effort.


Are we still paying for the Civil War?

The Civil War ended more than 150 years ago, but the U.S. government is still paying a veteran’s pension from that conflict. “One beneficiary from the Civil War [is] still alive and receiving benefits,” Randy Noller of the Department of Veterans Affairs confirms.


Who were known as Copperheads?

Copperhead, also called Peace Democrat, during the American Civil War, pejoratively, any citizen in the North who opposed the war policy and advocated restoration of the Union through a negotiated settlement with the South.


Who is on the 500000 dollar bill?

William McKinley$500 Series 1928 & 1934 Green Seal These green seal notes ($500 bills with the green seal are often called Federal Reserve notes) bear the portrait of William McKinley, the 25th President of the United States.


How much was a southern paper dollar worth by the end of the war?

In late 1864, a few months before the war’s end, one Confederate dollar was worth just three cents in U.S. currency.


What happened to the southern money after the Civil War?

Are Confederate Dollars Worth Any Money? When the Confederacy was disbanded as a political entity following the end of the Civil War, the currency lost all existing value as a medium of exchange. Confederate dollars are not accepted as legal tender anywhere.


Why was Confederate money worthless after the Civil War?

Near the end of the war, the currency became practically worthless as a medium of exchange. This was because, for the most part, Confederate currency were bills of credit, as in the Revolutionary War, not secured or backed by any assets.


How much money did the South lose in the Civil War?

Goldin and Lewis estimate that the combined outlays of both governments — in 1860 dollars — totaled $3.3 billion. To this they add $1.8 billion to account for the discounted economic value of casualties in the war, and they add $1.5 billion to account for the destruction of the war in the South.


When were revenue stamps issued?

Continue reading. Revenue stamps, also called fiscal stamps, have been issued around the world since the 17th century to verify the payment of taxes or fees on everything from alcohol and tobacco to playing cards and hunting licenses.


Why are there revenue stamps?

Revenue stamps, also called fiscal stamps, have been issued around the world since the 17th century to verify the payment of taxes or fees on everything from alcohol and tobacco to playing cards and hunting licenses. Not used for postage, these


What was the first stamp to collect taxes?

In 18th-century America, some of the first revenue stamps were produced to collect taxes on liquor. These stamps, known as Supervisors’ Seals, featured embossed rather than printed designs on their faces, as did the stamps used to collect taxes on paper and parchment, which were issued in 1798.


What was the first federal issue?

Collectively, these early embossed revenue stamps are known as the First Federal Issue. Adhesive-backed stamps, authorized by the Revenue Act of 1862, initially helped finance the Civil War, although the practice of using stamps to collect taxes persisted long after the conflict was over.


What is a revenue stamp?

Revenue stamps are found in many forms – gummed and un-gummed, perforated or imperforate, printed or embossed, and in a wide variety of sizes. Revenue stamps often contain elaborate designs as a means to prevent counterfeiting.


What is a tax stamp?

A revenue stamp , also known as a duty stamp, fiscal stamp, or tax stamp, usually is an adhesive label attached to an object to collect fees on alcohol, documents, drugs, firearm licenses, hunting licenses, medicines, playing cards, tobacco, and a host of other products. Manufacturers purchase stamps from the government and attach them to the products during manufacture or before the final sale.


Who signed the American Express stock certificate?

Stock certificate from the American Express Co. featuring signatures of Henry Wells and William Fargo.


Was the Little Miami Railroad stock transfer taxed?

The original sale of the Little Miami Railroad stock on July 15, 1862 was nontax able, but the transfer of the stock shown on the back of the stock certificate was taxed. The document also exhibits a combination of both imperforate and perforated revenue stamps as well as a very crisply struck handstamp cancel.


How many free states were there in the Union?

The 23 free states in the Union included. The Confederacy. The Confederate states included. Strengths and weaknesses of the Union. Strengths and Weaknesses of the Confederacy. Union vs Confederacy Fast Facts.


What was the Union?

The Union refers to the American states which remained loyal to the US Constitution and continued to be a part of USA. These states supported the Presidency of Abraham Lincoln. In all, the Union included 23 free states (where slavery was illegal) and 5 border states (which were located on the border between the North and the South).


Why did the Southern states require cheap labor?

Southern States required cheap manual labor for their cotton plantations. Southern States farming required cheap labor as farming and working the fields was labor intensive. The Union armies were more industrialized and therefore better equipped. Confederacy forces used their knowledge of the land to their advantage.


What were the strengths of the Union?

One of the strong points of the Union was that it was far more industrialized than the South. So when the Union armies needed weapons and other equipment, the industries in the North could easily produce and supply them. The Union states also had far more population than the Confederate states.


How many slave states were there in the Confederacy?

The Confederacy comprised of 11 slave states. These states supported slavery and did not want the federal government to have a lot of power, which is why they separated from USA when Abraham Lincoln was elected as President.


What was the Confederacy’s advantage in the war?

One key advantage of the Confederacy, however, was that it was fighting a defensive war.


Why was the United States divided into two groups?

In 1861, the United States of America was divided into two groups of states. This was because of some strong disagreements between these two groups. One of these groups comprised of the northern states of USA and was called the Union. The other group, which broke away from the Union, comprised of the southern states and was called the Confederacy.


What is Thomas Jefferson’s block of 3 5 cent stamps?

Block of 3 5-cent Thomas Jefferson (Scott #76) postage stamps used illegally as revenues on 1866 promissory note to J.H. Gulliford, a musical instruments dealer. Secondary transaction on the back is a ‘confession of judgement’, an extremely rare transaction, only a handful reported to exist. Mahler (1999) rarity rating of 9 with only 4 reported examples at that time. Ex-Turner (Lot 526 in the 1980 Turner sale, sold for $575 including BP at that time; transaction on back was not noted).#N#Catalogue value shown is just for a pair and single stamps off cover.


How much was the promissory note dated February 22, 1865?

Two promissory notes (one year and two year) dated February 22, 1865, each for $450, with 15 randomly placed #65.


What is a 1 cent postage stamp?

Very interesting piece. A 1-cent Franklin postage stamp used illegally as revenue, along with a horizontal pair of 10-cent Power of Attorney part perforates on a February 1863 voting proxy (early matching usage) from the Quincy mining company. A similar document (sans illegal usage) is shown in Mike Mahler’s book U.S. Revenue-Stamped Documents of the Civil War Era. The proxy was for 3 related family members, hence what should have been 30 cents tax. Either the clerk grabbed the wrong blue stamp in their haste, or they ran out of 10-cent revenue stamps and grabbed something that looked close. Either way, the document is doubly illegal: (1) postage stamp used as revenue, and (2) short payment of the tax.


How many blue threads are there on a stamp?

In this case, however, there are at least three blue silk threads visible on the face of the stamp. A wonderful example of a scarce silk paper.


What is Scott #113?

Scott # 113. Block of 4 and a single, used illegally as revenue stamps, paying 10-cents tax on a January 1, 1872 promissory note. Used blocks of #113 are incredibly scarce, considerably more so than mint blocks. To my knowledge, this is the only reported revenue usage of a #113 block.


Who signed the EMU?

Signed by Capt. Charles H. Marshall, at the age of 72, 2.5 years before his death in October of 1865. It’s a shame this was removed from the document, as it would have been a great EMU.


Is 45 cents taxable?

The correct tax, five cents per $100 or part thereof, should have been 25 cents per note, or 50 cents, but the illegal attempted payment, 45 cents was based on the cumulative total of $900. The two receipts on the back are not taxable because they were on the same sheet of paper as the notes.

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Overview

The postage stamps and postal system of the Confederate States of America carried the mail of the Confederacy for a brief period in American history. Early in 1861 when South Carolina no longer considered itself part of the Union and demanded that the U.S. Army abandon Fort Sumter, plans for a Confederate postal system were already underway. Indeed, the Confederate Post office wa…


Beginnings

During the first seven weeks of the Civil War, the US Post Office still delivered mail from the seceded states. Mail that was postmarked after the date of a state’s admission into the Confederacy through May 31, 1861, and bearing U.S. (Union) postage is deemed to represent ‘Confederate State Usage of U.S. Stamps’. i.e., Confederate covers franked with Union stamps. After this time, private express companies still managed to carry the mail across enemy lines. T…


Confederate Post Office

One of the first undertakings in establishing the Confederate Post Office was the appointment of John H. Reagan (1818–1905) to Postmaster General, by Jefferson Davis in 1861, making him the first Postmaster General of the newly formed Confederate post office. Reagan was a Democratic congressman from Texas (many years after the Civil War, Texas would elect him to a Senate seat)…


Confederate postage

Within a month after his appointment as Postmaster General, Reagan ordered that ads be placed in both Southern and Northern newspapers seeking sealed proposals from printing companies for producing Confederate postage stamps. Bids arrived from companies in New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Newark, New Orleans and Richmond. After the war started, however, it became evident that t…


Covers

A considerable number of Confederate covers (i.e. stamped – addressed envelope) survived the Civil War and through the many years since they were mailed and have been avidly sought after and preserved by historians and collectors alike. The war had divided family members and friends across the country, and letter writing naturally increased dramatically, especially to and fr…


See also

• August Dietz, publisher of Confederate States of America postal history
• Confederate States of America
• Commemoration of the American Civil War on postage stamps
• Frank Crown


Further reading

• Anderson, John Nathan. (2013) “Money or Nothing: Confederate Postal System Collapse during the Civil War,” American Journalism, 30 (Winter 2013), 65–86.
• Bennett, Michael, (1998) United States and Confederate Postal History: The 206th Public Auction, November 15, 1998, Michael Bennett, Incorporated, 214 pages, Book


Other sources

• August Dietz, Postal Service of the Confederate States of America (1929) – the standard work on Confederate philately
• Dietz Confederate States Catalog and Hand-Book (1931–1986)
• AskPhil – Glossary of Stamp Collecting Terms

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