How to get a job from attending a conference

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How to get a job at a conference

  1. Choosing the right event. We’ve all sat through the odd talk that wasn’t what you thought it would be. However, this…
  2. Advance preparation. Research the attendees, sponsors and speakers. If you can find out who’ll be there, checkout…
  3. Use social media. A couple of strategic follows, likes and comments will start the…

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How can I make the most of my next conference?

From prepping beforehand to having a great time while you’re there, here’s what you need to know to make the most of your next conference. 1. Gain Visibility A great way to maximize your conference experience is to participate in some way—like being a presenter, session facilitator, or committee volunteer.

Is attending conferences good for your career?

Attending conferences might be one of the best things you can do for your career. You’ll learn about industry trends, gain some new skills, and make all kinds of new connections. (And yes, there’s usually travel and free meals involved.) But all those speakers, sessions, contacts, and conversations can also be overwhelming.

Should you bring a colleagues to a conference?

One caveat: there are always people at conferences who only talk to people they already know. Having a colleague to hang out with is great, but make sure it doesn’t stop you from meeting new people.

How do I find people to connect with at a conference?

If you know of people you want to reconnect with or get to know better who will be attending—clients, vendors, friends-of-friends—reach out a few weeks before the conference to set up a time to meet for coffee or a meal while you’re at the event. 3. Get Briefed

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How do I get the most out of attending a conference?

10 Ways to Make the Most Out of a ConferenceGain Visibility. … Build Stronger Relationships. … Get Briefed. … Choose the Right Sessions. … Remember What You Learn. … Connect With the Speakers. … Schmooze at the Social Events. … Put Away the Smartphone.More items…•


How do I network for a conference job?

Bring your business cards to the conference and hand them out to the people you meet. Business cards are often the best and easiest way to share your information with new connections. Write a personal note on the card before presenting it to your new connection to ensure they remember you.


Are conferences worth attending?

Conferences are a great way to receive feedback from experts on your work, build new professional relationships, find new marketing opportunities, and check out your competitors. So don’t be afraid to reach out to the people you meet there because experience shows that most of them are open to help.


What do you do after a conference?

What Do You Do After a ConferenceReach out to say thank you. … Disseminate surveys. … Update your conference website. … Send periodical newsletters and updates. … Get organized and ready for your next conference.


How many resumes should I bring to a conference?

It is important that your resume stands out among the crowd for all of the right reasons. Be sure to bring at least 3 printed copies of your resume to the hiring event to hand out to multiple employers or recruiters. You will also want to steer clear of these ten resume fails that can keep you from getting the job.


How do you network a conference without being awkward?

Conference Tips: How to NetworkChat about the talks. … Write down additional information straight away. … Have a lot of conversations. … Join the event Facebook group. … Say ‘yes’ to off-site lunches with cool people. … Don’t be creepy. … Wait until speakers have a moment to recuperate before approaching them.More items…•


Why is attending conferences important?

Attending a conference in your field can broaden your network, promote deeper understanding, uncover new learnings and reinforce existing best practices. Done well they can also be a lot of fun.


Why should you attend industry conferences?

Attending an industry conference is a great idea on a number of levels. More than the takeaways you get from the speaking sessions themselves, you also get invaluable networking time, opening up the door for new business, new partnerships and new perspectives.


How do you connect after a conference?

Tips for Following Up With a Contact From a Networking EventFollow up within 24 hours. You want to follow up quickly so that the acquaintance remembers you. … Mention a conversation from the event. … Offer to help. … Ask to meet up. … Connect on LinkedIn. … Edit, edit, edit.


What do you bring to a conference?

Pack the following items for your next business conference or seminar to ensure you are prepared, comfortable and productive.Reusable water bottle. … Business cards. … Leisure clothes. … Charger/extended batteries. … Notebook and pen. … A watch. … Comfortable shoes. … Sweater.More items…


What should I post after a conference?

Post-Event CommunicationsSend a thank you email. … Send a “sorry we missed you” email to no-shows. … Create a post-event page. … Ask them to fill out a post-event survey. … Have your sales or customer teams personally follow-up. … Share relevant content. … Send them an invitation to another event.


How do you network at a virtual conference?

How to Network at a Virtual Event?Identify Your Networking Goals. … Provide Your Full Bio to the Event Organisers. … Engage and Participate in the Discussions. … Build a Small community. … Share Your Participation Pre- and Post-Event on Social Media. … Other Things to Consider to Maximise Your Virtual Event Networking Efforts.


How do you network a conference alone?

7 Tips for Attending a Conference Alone (And Having a Good Time)Imagine that Other People are Shy too. … Homework First. … Leverage Technology. … Dress Comfortably and with Confidence. … Don’t Eat Lunch or Dinner Alone. … Pamper Yourself a Little. … Follow Up after the Conference.


How do students network at a conference?

A student’s guide to networking at professional conferencesBe Prepared. Conferences are fast-paced, so it is often beneficial to create a schedule ahead of time. … Present your research. Presenting your research is a great way to connect with others. … Get involved. … Keep in touch.


1. Choosing the right event

We’ve all sat through the odd talk that wasn’t what you thought it would be. However, this should be the anomaly not the norm, so make sure you do a bit of research into the conference content.


2. Advance preparation

Research the attendees, sponsors and speakers. If you can find out who’ll be there, checkout their LinkedIn profiles or website team page so you can spot them in the crowd.


3. Use social media

A couple of strategic follows, likes and comments will start the conversation ahead of the event. A developer once sent me a tweet before a WordCamp that said “Pint on me at the after party, would love to chat to you about working with you”.


4. Find the networking spots

Networking is loved and loathed. In some people’s minds the term conjures up images of suited business people circulating a stuffy room thrusting business cards in each other’s palms. Thankfully, at most digital conferences, networking comes in a variety of forms. The key is making the use of the small amount of time you have:


Networking bonus

I once attended a networking breakfast, where a gentleman circulated the room, dropping business cards onto everyone’s breakfast plate without saying a word. He left immediately afterwards. He certainly made an impression (I remember his performance after 10 years), but not a good one.


5. Present yourself

Prepare your Twitter, LinkedIn profile, Github repo, online portfolio or anywhere else someone might stumble across you online. Sound positive and enthusiastic about searching for your next role in your bio.


6. Do more than just attend

There is always a call for organisers, volunteers and speakers at conferences. By taking on these roles you’re helping yourself become more visible. It’s a fantastic way to get deeper into the community and increases opportunities to meet more people.


What to do if you are intimidated by speaking at a conference?

If speaking at a conference is too intimidating right now, you may be able to participate in other capacities. Many conferences give out free tickets to those who volunteer their time. Usually this means you wont get to see every talks, and maybe even miss out on something you really wanted to see, but it also means you’ll be in a great position to network. You’ll get to work with other volunteers who are involved in the community and start to build those relationships that are one of the greatest benefits of any conference.


How can I learn anything?

The first step to learning anything is knowing what it is you need to learn. By attending a conference, you are able to get a pulse on the community and where it’s heading. Expand your awareness of what is currently available, as well as new research and ideas and the tools and technologies that those findings are bringing to life. Staying on the cutting edge with how these new tools and technologies might improve what you’re currently doing and even drive where you or your company are heading.


Do conferences offer scholarships?

First, if you’re a student, unemployed or part of a minority, many conferences offer scholarships or discounted rates. Some of the scholarships may even cover travel costs, so please take advantage of these discounts and scholarships when you can, that’s what they are there for.


Is it hard to budget for a conference?

Cost is one of the biggest roadblocks people face . “Money doesn’t grow on trees”, and for most of us, that means attending a conference can be a hard thing to budget. On top of the cost for the conference itself, there can be flights, hotels, meals and missed work. And if you’re a student or looking for a job, this can be even more challenging. Here are a few ideas that can help make a budget possible.


Do conferences pay for speakers?

Many conferences give conference tickets and cover travel costs for speakers. Some conference may even pay their speakers. Not all conferences offer these packages, so check with the conference you wish to attend. If you’re interested in going this route, try starting with a local user group, lightning talks (5-10 min), or uncon (usually held along with a conference in a separate room. You sign up on the day of the event by writing your talk/name on a board).


2. Start with small talk

Engage your prospective candidate in a conversation relating to the conference or workshop topics. Evaluate their breadth of knowledge throughout the conversation before you bring up even a hint of any potential job opportunity. You don’t want to invest your time and effort in a person who doesn’t actually match your ideal candidate profile.


3. Get sufficient background information

If the person you’ve met could be a potential fit for your team, find out a little bit more about where the person currently works and his or her responsibilities (still remembering you are not facilitating an interview). If you know the person’s job title, you can more easily gauge if he or she might be looking to make a move.


4. Mention a position

Despite what I’ve suggested earlier, don’t spend too much time making small talk unless you’re genuinely interested in what the person has to say. Get to the point, mention a potential position and gauge their reaction.


5. Follow up

The typical potential candidate isn’t going to bite on the first bit of bait so make sure you follow up with the individual through email, a social media connection or telephone call. That way you can provide additional information on the opportunity and explain why you believe he or she should consider your offer.


What is a conference?

A conference is a great place to connect with the right people and gather information. If you are actively looking for a job or gathering ideas of companies you’d like to work for next, definitely spend a majority of your time networking during the conference. The checklist below contains some of the most important points to remember …


Why do networking conferences have happy hours?

In fact, the reason “Happy Hour” exists at conferences is so these smart people can intermingle and meet each other.


What are the goals of a learner conference?

This goal can come with a few secondary goals: 1) bring knowledge back to your team, 2) better yourself and become a more valuable asset to your team, and 3) generally gain awareness about


Can I go to a conference without a goal?

Go to a conference without having any goals. No, seriously. That’s like “doing marketing” without having any idea why you’re doing it or what you’re trying to accomplish. For a conference, you really just need a basic, high-level goal such as, “I’m here to learn,” or “I want to meet people” — you don’t need to get into the nitty-gritty details.


Is it easier to make a sale when the prospect is standing in front of you?

It’s much easier to make a sale when the prospect is standing right in front of you — especially if you have a product that you can demonstrate live. The checklist below contains some of the most important points to remember if you’re attending a conference so you can close more deals.


How to maximize your conference experience?

1. Gain Visibility. A great way to maximize your conference experience is to participate in some way—like being a presenter, session facilitator, or committee volunteer. (When you see the initial posting for the conference, check out if there are these options available, or email the conference organizer directly to ask.) …


What is a conference?

A conference is the time to meet new people, but it’s also a time to build on the relationships you already have. If you know of people you want to reconnect with or get to know better who will be attending—clients, vendors, friends-of-friends—reach out a few weeks before the conference to set up a time to meet for coffee or a meal …


What are the best things to do in your career?

Attending conferences might be one of the best things you can do for your career. You’ll learn about industry trends, gain some new skills, and make all kinds of new connections. (And yes, there’s usually travel and free meals involved.)


Pick the right conference for your personality and your research

It sounds simple and yet is really worth remembering: the best way to get your work accepted is to target it to an appropriate conference. Conferences can be large or small, very specialist or more broad, and based on a single subject or more interdisciplinary.


Look out for a Call for Abstracts

To know when conferences are going to be held, keep an eye on relevant websites and sign up to email newsletters. A good place to start would be asking at your own faculty, as your professors will be familiar with annual conferences in the field and can point you in the right direction.


Tips on submitting your abstract

If you’ve identified the conference which is right for you and they’ve put out their Call for Abstracts, then you just need to write an abstract of a few hundred words describing what work you can present. Remember that an abstract proposing to present experimental results is usually more likely to be accepted than one presenting theoretical work.


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